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A dispute between Colorado Republicans and Democrats is being settled by the state supreme court.

At issue is the way bills are read during the legislative session. If I understand correctly,  Colorado's constitution requires legislative bills to be read out loud to the state session but apparently doesn't stipulate how the bills must be read.

According to a report in the Canon City Daily Record, in 2019, when it was requested to have a 2,023-page bill read out loud in its entirety, Democrats set up six computers to read different sections of a bill at the same time. The speed-reading computers essentially fulfilled the requirement to have the 2.023-page bill read out loud, but, of course, the words were incomprehensible. It was estimated that the real-time reading of the bill would take about 60 hours.

One side says the reading of the bill should be understandable and the other side says speed-reading the bills is a more responsible use of lawmakers' time. The Colorado Supreme Court heard the arguments on Tuesday and will make a ruling later this year.

Common sense seems to be lacking on both sides of the issue. The idea of reading a 2,000-plus page document out loud seems ridiculous. Is anybody really going to be able to stay awake to listen that long? On the other hand, having the documents read at lightning speed just to fulfill an obligation doesn't seem to make sense either.

It feels like nothing but typical political haggling that so often times impedes the progress of state and federal lawmakers. Individuals look for loopholes in the system to exploit to further their cause, while others use technicalities to stall the discussion and advancement of the particular legislation. Why does it have to be this way?

We will see what the Colorado Supreme Court has to say about the matter. Hopefully, a decision will bring some resolution to the matter and get state lawmakers on the same page.

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