Colorado is home to various wildlife and animals, but have you ever come across a snow flea before?

According to a report from the University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado Snow Fleas hang out between 7,500- and 12,000-feet above sea level in forested mountain slopes.

Learning About Colorado Snow Fleas

As a non-native to Colorado, I'm learning new things each and every day. Today, however, when I stumbled across the term "snow flea"  I immediately thought, "no way!"

Just thinking about a bug sends chills down my spine, and I was certain that I'd be dealing with a lot fewer insects here in the midwest versus the south.

Apparently, I was wrong because Colorado State University reports that 80 different species of fleas live in Colorado, which is among the greatest number found in any state!

What Are Colorado Snow Fleas?

Since the initial shock has worn off, I can explain what a snow flea really is. A Colorado snow flea is in fact, not even a flea at all! Snow fleas are actually classified as hexapods and are more commonly referred to as Springtails.

These tiny creatures are only 2.5mm long and are, "black with a bronze iridescence, and they are covered in small white hairs that can only be seen with the aid of a microscope."

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To make things even a bit more confusing, the Farmer's Almanac states that Springtails (snow fleas) are actually more closely related to crustaceans than insects.

How the snow flea has more in common with a lobster than an insect has my head spinning, but it is what it is.

Why Are They Called Colorado Snow Fleas If They Aren't Fleas?

Springtails, appear very similar to your average flea, and they even jump long distances like the average flea. However, Springtails actually have a tail that assists them in making these jumps, hence the name.

Are Colorado Snow Fleas Harmful?

Now the question that we all want the answer to - do those little crustacean suckers bite?

Thank goodness, the answer is no, Colorado snow fleas do not bite.

In fact, snow fleas are incredibly beneficial to our environment as they munch on and help decompose organic material. So, they may be ugly, but they have an important job to do in Colorado!

11 Silly Misconceptions About Living in Colorado

Your friends and family probably mean well when they tell you what they've heard about the Centennial state, but is their information based on fact or fiction?

Was A Colorado Insect Used As A Secret Weapon During the Cold War?

The Colorado Potato Beetle was first discovered in Colorado in the 1800s. It was soon discovered these colorful bugs loved potato plants - and that was bad news for potatoes. Within a few years, they had made their way to the Atlantic Coast which resulted in American potato imports being banned by several countries. Did the United States have a secret weapon they could use against their enemies?

Exotic Pets You Can Own in Colorado

From alpacas to kangaroos, here are the exotic pets that you can own in Colorado.

Animals truly are the best thing ever, it's amazing how they show us, unconditional love. There are surprisingly lots of exotic animals that you're legally allowed to own here in Colorado.