Last fall, singer Josey Scott teased his return to Saliva, the band where he made a name for himself in the early 2000s. But, as talk of a "Nu-Metal Revival" tour continues to swirl with Saliva involved, he revealed to the Meltdown show on Detroit's WRIF that he will not be part of the run.

"I just wanted to clarify a few things to the fans and let the fans of Saliva know that I don't want to mislead them in any way," Scott said, as transcribed by Blabbermouth. "I I wanted to respond to the reaction from the fans about the tour that Saliva is about to do, the 'Nu-Metal' tour announcement that came in, to let the fans of Saliva know that, unfortunately, I will not be on that tour. But soon. It's gonna be a minute until we can iron out some details. It sucks, but it's little things that have to be done."

"It's all about the fans," he continued. "And I just wanted to be completely authentic with the fans and let 'em know that I won't be on this tour — for the rest of the year I won't be out with Saliva — but soon and very soon I'll be coming back."

Though Scott won't be part of the tour, he is still planning to "write some new music" with Chris D'Abaldo and Wayne Swinney. "I'm hoping to get some new music ready around the anniversary of Every Six Seconds, which will be in 2021," he added. "It'll be 20 years... But, like I said, I'll be, hopefully, fingers crossed, getting back together with Wayne Swinny. And me and Chris are like dark and light — we're a package deal. [Laughs] So, anytime that Wayne is ready, me and Chris are ready to go." Scott also revealed that Tosha Jones will be playing drums, while former Breaking Benjamin bassist Mark Klepaski is also involved.

Scott exited Saliva in 2011 after releasing six records with the band. The group then issued four more albums with Bobby Amaru on vocals.

At present, only a July 17 show at Sayreville, New Jersey's Starland Ballroom has been announced for the "Nu-Metal Revival" tour, which includes Saliva, Powerman 5000, Adema, Flaw and Andrew W. Boss.

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