For many years, Colorado has used different means to control avalanches, including explosives like dynamite. These avalanches are purposely triggered in order to minimize the risk of a disaster happening on its own which could easily result in harm for anyone close enough.

Get our free mobile app

While using dynamite sounds pretty cool, the Colorado Department of Transportation has almost completely transitioned into controlling avalanches using what are referred to as "eggs."

What Are Colorado's Avalanche Eggs + How Do They Work?

These spaceship-looking eggs are not UFOs, but rather a means to remotely trigger avalanches around Colorado.

CBS Colorado via YouTube
CBS Colorado via YouTube
loading...

During the summer months, the eggs are put into storage and are filled with a gas which is an integral part of triggering the avalanches.

CBS Colorado via YouTube
CBS Colorado via YouTube
loading...

Once winter rolls around, CDOT takes the eggs filled with the gas to places such as the mountains that border I-70 and are left there for the entire season.

CBS Colorado via YouTube
CBS Colorado via YouTube
loading...

They are carried via helicopter to all of the places that CDOT determines are the most useful for triggering avalanches.

CBS Colorado via YouTube
CBS Colorado via YouTube
loading...

Once placed, the eggs are detonated remotely which releases some of the gas from the bottom of the egg, effectively triggering avalanches as safely as possible.

CBS Colorado via YouTube
CBS Colorado via YouTube
loading...

Each egg is equipped with an antenna, and the gas that the eggs are filled with lasts all winter long.

There are numerous types of these eggs, some of which actually explode, but all are detonated remotely to ensure the most safety for anyone involved.

[CBS Colorado]

Smoke Shacks are Secret Manmade Huts on Colorado Ski Mountains

WARNING: Under no circumstances should you enter this property. By doing so you risk bodily harm and/or prosecution for trespassing on private property.

If you’re not a ski bum or a ‘local’ in a ski town, you may not know about the secret, manmade huts on Colorado ski mountains known as ‘smoke shacks.’

Gallery Credit: Nate Wilde

What is Cloud Seeding and Why Does Colorado do it?

Cloud seeding is a process carried out by Colorado’s local government to increase precipitation across the state, and the way it’s done and how it works is fascinating.

Gallery Credit: Nate Wilde

Meet the Snow Guardian: Colorado’s Most Interesting Hermit

Billy Barr has been called an eccentric, a hermit, and a scientist.

Gallery Credit: Nate Wilde

More From 95 Rock