A conversation overheard by students at Caprock Academy seemed threatening enough it was reported to staff. The report led to the arrest of two students. It also raises concerns about what parents aren't discussing with their children.

The two students arrested were heard discussing the recent school shootings in Florida and were making comments that other students felt were possible threats to the school staff and students. Kudos to the students who felt adults needed to know what was said.

Following the report, the Grand Junction Police Department was called to investigate. After interviewing the 15 and 16 year-old students, police determined there was no immediate threat to the school.

Both students questioned were issued summons for Interference with Staff, Faculty or Students of an Educational Institutions a class one misdemeanor.

In light of school shootings this year, including one last week in Florida, how many parents have actually sat down and discussed those tragedies and their personal feelings and responses to something like this with their children?

I don't know for sure, but there would likely be two less students arrested if parents had a meaningful, honest, and open conversation about what to do and say when discussing such emotional subjects.

Our children have realized that 'don't worry, it can't happen here' no longer applies. A tragic event 2,200 miles away in another state is no longer a buffer. In a child's mind, each one of these school killings feels closer to their possible reality.

Parents, it's time to deal with this in a way that's more than feeling sad for the violence. Empathy for others is key, but so is knowing other emotions like apprehension, fear, anxiety, frustration, anger and anything else your child is feeling.

If you're not entirely sure how to get the conversation started, there are plenty of people and answers in the same building where your child attends school. A teacher, school counselor, principal or other faculty member is there to help.

Words are incredibly powerful. If chosen carefully and used wisely, they can be amazingly effective for both those who speak and hear them. Let's make sure our kids understand that power and how to use it for the betterment of everyone around them.